GRAMMATICAL MISTAKES THAT MAKE YOU LOOK “POORLY” - Blog - 98.3 MAX FM
February 17, 2021 | by: chadwilcox

GRAMMATICAL MISTAKES THAT MAKE YOU LOOK “POORLY”

I should really take note of some of these…

✗ “Should of” instead of “should have”: “Should of,” “could of,” and “would of” are not expressions. In fairness, should of sounds a lot like should’ve, a contraction of “should have.” But don’t let the speedy pronunciation fool you—the only correct expression is “should(/could/would) have.”
✗ Lay vs. Lie:  they’ve been confusing us for centuries, in part, because lay is the past tense of lie, and laid is the past tense of lay. Remember: You lie down, but you lay something down.
✗ Me vs. I:  If I am doing the action, then use ‘I.’ If I’m not doing the action or if I’m being acted upon, I’ll use ‘me.’ For example, ‘Larry hit the ball to me or I?’
✗ It’s vs. its:  Yes, an apostrophe usually indicates possessive form. Apostrophes also link two words together in a contraction. A common error uses the contraction “it’s” (which means “it is”) as the possessive form of “it.” For the possessive form of “it,” there’s no apostrophe required. (I’ll never get it’s right…)
✗ Effect vs. affect:  “Affect” is usually going to be a verb, and “effect” is usually going to be a noun. The best rule of thumb is this: “Affect with an A is an Action” and “Effect with an E is an End-result.” (And “affect” literally means to produce an “effect”, which is just weird.)
✗ There, they’re, and their:  The best way to know which one to use is to go to Facebook and see how the word is used. Do the opposite.